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TOP PICKS | 17 TOOLS

Student Portfolio Apps and Websites

Portfolios are a time-tested and teacher-trusted method for assessing student learning. But what happens when students ditch notebooks and folders for laptops and tablets? These tech tools are here to help, offering students virtual binders, folders, web pages, and galleries for collecting everything from text to video. They also give teachers the ability to easily browse through their students' work and assess remotely.

Interesting in seeing how two of the best student portfolio apps compare? Check out our EdTech Showdown featuring Seesaw and FreshGrade.

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Artsonia Kids Art Museum

Online art museum empowers students to exhibit, explain their work

Bottom line: A well-loved digital art museum that allows students to share work and reflect on their artistic process while helping teachers assess student understanding of artistic concepts.

Sesame

Portfolio tool keeps report cards from being a surprise

Bottom line: A great way for teachers, students, and parents to keep tabs on student progress and to better assess students holistically.

Dreamdo Schools

Sleek project-based learning platform encourages global connections

Bottom line: An excellent tool for project-based learning; plan, create, and share learning around the world.

Seesaw: The Learning Journal

Versatile digital portfolio appeals to teachers, students, and parents

Bottom line: Students can showcase their work in text, pictures, videos, and more.

WeLearnedIt

Digital portfolio and management tool for project-based classrooms

Bottom line: Impressive tool for individualized learning and managing projects is best for 1-to-1 iPad classrooms.

FreshGrade

A fresh way to capture, document, and share student learning

Bottom line: Multimedia documentation tools help communicate learning and expand assessment, and the addition of a gradebook sets this tool apart; still, student experience could use some polish.

Edmodo

Manage classes, content, and communication with social LMS platform

Bottom line: This free platform allows for teacher-monitored classroom communication but lacks excitement.

eBackpack

Easy system to submit, review, and store digital assignments

Bottom line: This is a great way to create a paperless classroom, but its potential for enhancing learning depends completely on how teachers use it.

Evernote

Impressive organizational tool has limitless uses

Bottom line: This free information-management tool can help kids become tech-savvy and learn to better organize their digital lives.

LiveBinders

Cool organization and eportfolio tool; watch out for privacy features

Bottom line: A good tool for its organizational, storage, and digital publishing features.

Microsoft OneNote

Note-taking giant built for flexible, collaborative work

Bottom line: A powerful (and free) tool for thinking and organization that's making smart strides in the education space.

Pathbrite

Create, organize, assess sleek digital portfolios

Bottom line: A simple PBL tool that promotes digital literacy and lets kids create flexible, accessible digital portfolios.

Project Foundry

Helpful, yet complex, management tool for project-based learning

Bottom line: A powerful, though sometimes complex, tool for providing inquiry-based, student-centered learning.

Bulb

Slick portfolio tool has cool features, limited feedback options

Bottom line: A neat tool for publishing online, possibly better suited to teacher content creation than student publishing.

Exibi

Comprehensive but complex tool for creating and publishing portfolios

Bottom line: This is a fantastic choice if you take eportfolios seriously; just be prepared to devote serious time to teaching the tool.

Dropbox

Handy cloud storage and document sharing

Bottom line: Dropbox can make work and life in the digital world more efficient, but it may not be the best cloud-based solution for kids.

Google Sites

Make your own website with customizable templates

Bottom line: With a few clicks, kids can design and populate a unique website, but customization requires multiple layers of directions.

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