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Cool Math Games for High School

As high school students diligently prepare for the stress of college and career, teachers sometimes need to reignite the concept of play. From factorization to graphing equations, games can help students apply the skills they've learned and let them have fun at the same time. Check out our list for game-based learning tools that will get students manipulating 3D shapes, solving quadratic equations, and enhancing their problem-solving prowess.

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Mangahigh

Phenomenal adaptive math games with a killer teacher dashboard

Bottom line: Fantastic tool for flipped or blended classrooms, formative assessment, or extra practice in any setting. It's gamification that really works.

FAKTR

Electro-futuristic prime-factorization game is a total blast

Bottom line: The process of factoring becomes completely intuitive after one playthrough, and that makes it a huge learning success. Plus, it's just plain fun.

Crafty Cut

Gorgeous 2-D and 3-D shapes game offers intellectual play at its best

Bottom line: One of the best ways to explore the relationships between 2-D and 3-D shapes and promote spatial reasoning in a way worksheets can't touch.

DragonBox Algebra 12+

Super fun, cutting-edge approach to learning and practicing algebra

Bottom line: Kids build a strong foundation for algebra by learning the underlying concepts for solving equations with this extremely fun and educational math tool.

Divide by Sheep

Extremely addictive puzzle game has dark, slightly gory play

Bottom line: A great game for math problem-solving, but be careful choosing your audience.

Quadrant Defender

Graphing equations is the key to victory in tower defense game

Bottom line: An effective and more motivating way to get students to practice graphing linear equations.

Variant: Limits

3D calculus game has fun virtual world, frustrating feedback

Bottom line: Despite some glitches, students who don't love math may love this game, and learn a little about limits along the way.

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