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Best History Websites and Resources

These great history websites help make the past and present relevant and accessible to students. There are research resources students can explore including firsthand accounts, images, videos, audio, and scholarly work. Many of these sites feature expertly curated museum and archival collections that help students step into history. Driven by their burning questions about the past, students can use these sites to analyze primary documents, artifacts, historical figures, and significant time periods. Teachers will also find a few picks on this list aimed specifically at them, featuring lesson plans and resources informed by the latest historical research.

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Asian Art Museum

Inventive lessons and activities integrate Asian history, art, and more

Bottom line: It offers an in-depth look at Asia’s influence on art and history and provides lots of creative tools for educators.

PebbleGo

Easily accessible, kid-friendly database for the littlest researchers

Bottom line: Delightful, safe introduction to the world of research, databases, and reporting, with interesting articles and helpful teacher supports.

National Museum of African American History and Culture

Powerful stories and media centralize African-American history

Bottom line: While there aren't ready-to-go curricular materials, this modern, well-curated, and well-contextualized digital collection is sure to inspire compelling lessons.

Smithsonian's History Explorer

Lessons, activities, artifacts, artfully presented by the Smithsonian

Bottom line: A fantastic resource for kids and teachers alike, it has everything you need to fall in love with history.

Library of Congress

Visit our largest library's online collection of multimedia goodies

Bottom line: The Library of Congress delivers the best of America's past and present, but it's a little tricky to navigate.

EDSITEment

Extensive humanities resource offers deep well of great content

Bottom line: The National Endowment for the Humanities has put together an outstanding place for art, history, language, and literature.

National Archives

Access U.S. history with treasure trove of docs, genealogy, and other resources

Bottom line: NARA's website wasn't designed for kids, but they can definitely use it to research and learn about history, genealogy, and the U.S. population and government.

Digital Public Library of America

Impressive online collection of historic and cultural artifacts

Bottom line: This epic database of history and culture is a labor of love that all students can benefit from.

Gooru

Personalized tool fosters exploration, teacher-led meaningful learning

Bottom line: A great portal for supplementing classroom instruction; supports independent and personalized learning.

findingDulcinea

Aging search tool has curated resources and links to credible sites

Bottom line: It can help kids quickly find credible websites for study and schoolwork, but those resources will be a bit out-of-date.

SweetSearch

Search engine with filtered results leaves room for critical thinking

Bottom line: SweetSearch supplies valid, reputable websites that can help kids learn about a variety of topics.

American Panorama

Interactive atlas magnifies events in United States history

Bottom line: With layers of learning opportunities, this is a unique interactive resource to supplement curriculum.

Beyond the Bubble

Top-quality assessments challenge students to think like historians

Bottom line: A ready-to-go, pedagogically sound route for refocusing formative assessment on critical thinking and literacy rather than memorization.

Facing History and Ourselves

A wealth of resources explore racism, prejudice, and anti-Semitism

Bottom line: These valuable materials empower students to understand and address difficult ethical choices -- past and present.

Google Arts & Culture

Excellent curation and an unmatched art collection invite exploration

Bottom line: A one-stop shop for a vast amount of compellingly curated and contextualized art, but it's lacking educator supports.

National Archives DocsTeach

Historical texts, interactive activities can promote critical thinking

Bottom line: This text-rich app encourages students to conduct their own analysis of history, but the formats and graphics may prevent them from making a thorough analysis.

NYPL Biblion: World's Fair

Dive deep into treasures from the 1940 World’s Fair

Bottom line: This digital glimpse into the NYPL’s holdings is a lot to take in all at once, but it’s a rewarding journey.

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Extensive resource collection supports teaching about the Holocaust

Bottom line: As a valuable resource for anyone teaching or learning about the Holocaust, time to explore and plan is necessary in order to make the materials effective.

American Social History Project

Deep, research-backed resources highlight America's rich diversity

Bottom line: Worth the time investment, because these valuable, socially progressive materials will add depth to the study of American history.

Zinn Education Project

Resources, lessons help teach a more inclusive version of U.S. history

Bottom line: Free downloadable resources encourage critical thinking and active learning in search of a more accurate picture of American history.

National WWII Museum

High-quality resources and activities offer an in-depth study

Bottom line: Materials and activities support a thorough study of World War II, making this a valuable resource for both teachers and students.

Historypin

Crowdsourcing is key to making history accessible, approachable

Bottom line: Historypin is an engaging tool to get kids interested in the history of their community and the world.

Constitute

Extensive, highly searchable collection of the world's constitutions

Bottom line: Quickly and easily access almost any country's constitution, locate an excerpt, or compare governments.

Google Scholar

Academic search engine, an excellent source for credible research info

Bottom line: This smart tool can help teens locate credible material for paper and report writing, general research, and other school projects.

Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History

History and art intersect on the Met's vast, reading-centric site

Bottom line: This resource from the Metropolitan Museum of Art beautifully illustrates art's evolution and is great for research, but more interactivity would help balance out the text-heavy content.

The Living New Deal | Still Working for America

Archival site is a treasure trove for New Deal researchers

Bottom line: While it doesn't offer much specifically for teachers or students, it's a must-use site for primary source material if you have a unit on the New Deal or Great Depression.

Stanford History Education Group

High-quality, document-based lessons spark stellar historical inquiry

Bottom line: A gold mine of CCSS-aligned lessons for U.S. and world history teachers; encourages reading, analysis, and collaboration.

Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database

Deep, complex database is challenging but a peerless research tool

Bottom line: This is a highly academic site for better and for worse; it's filled with deep, research-backed resources and primary sources but is intimidating without clear guidance.

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