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10 Great Free Games for High School Students

Dig into this curated list of highly rated free games for high school. There's a spread of content areas from science to social studies to social-emotional learning. More importantly, the games help to build a range of skills that will be useful to students inside and outside the classroom. Each game is absorbing and detailed, offering experiences certain to challenge older students.

If you're looking for ways to introduce game-based learning into your classroom, check out our Teaching Strategies for how to Find the Learning in Any Game.

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Spaceteam ESL

Chaotic game offers silly yet novel way to practice English vocab

Bottom line: An irresistibly fun way for ELLs to practice high-frequency English vocabulary, but as an app it's a bit rough around the edges.

Geoguessr

"Just one more turn" gameplay jazzes up geography

Bottom line: It's not a typical educational game, but students are inspired to explore the world and encouraged to think critically about what defines culture and geography.

Little Alchemy

Flex alchemical muscles in discovery-based puzzler

Bottom line: While it won't teach much out of the box, Little Alchemy can be a great way to amp up the fun and build interest in math, science, history, and even literature.

ARIS

Create valuable Pokémon Go-style learning games for iOS devices

Bottom line: A teacher who is willing to learn ARIS can create robust mobile experiences that will resonate with students.

NewsFeed Defenders

Social media simulation builds news literacy skills

Bottom line: This is a great tool to kick off critical discussions about news and social media.

Textadventures.co.uk

Play or design text adventures, but creation can get technical

Bottom line: Text adventures can be a blast to play and make, but the Quest game-making tool, while offering some decent support, can be tough to use effectively without coding experience.

That's Your Right

Card game gets students to wield the power of the Bill of Rights

Bottom line: This is a high-quality, surprisingly fun way to see how the Bill of Rights relates to every day situations.

Liyla and the Shadows of War

Stark, arresting game offers emotional perspective on war's human toll

Bottom line: The short length and powerful themes make this an effective way to help students consider the brutal effects of war on families.

Parable of the Polygons

Dynamic interactive helps classrooms explore topics of bias, diversity

Bottom line: A fascinating way to address how communities become segregated due to individual bias.

The Republia Times

Unassuming editorial sim elegantly exposes the business of bias

Bottom line: What this game lacks in pizzazz it makes up for in smarts, and it's certain to get students thinking and talking about bias and media politics.

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