App review by Stacy Zeiger, Common Sense Education | Updated November 2013
SentenceBuilder For IPad
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SentenceBuilder For IPad

Sentence games have potential to build grammar knowledge and skills

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Learning rating
Editorial review by Common Sense Education
Community rating
Based on 2 reviews
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Not yet rated Expert evaluation by Common Sense
Grades
1–6 This grade range is based on learning appropriateness and doesn't take into account privacy. It's determined by Common Sense Education, not the product's publisher.
Subjects & Skills
English Language Arts, English-Language Learning, Communication & Collaboration, Critical Thinking

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Pros: The sentences cover multiple parts of speech and help kids learn to accurately describe in their writing.

Cons: Because it isn't completely adaptive and responsive, there are some big missed opportunities for explicit teaching that could be very helpful for some kids.

Bottom Line: Students can learn how to create descriptive sentences and can pick up some important grammar knowledge in the process.

Sentence Builder for iPad works well as a wholeclass bell-ringer or as an individual review activity where students take turns building sentences. Because the app misses some opportunities for instruction at teachable moments, it's great if teachers can work with students, asking them to explain the grammar behind their sentences. Standing by, asking "Why did you select the word those instead of them?" or "Did you make sure your subject and verb agree?" might be the best way to get the most out of a tool like this. Teachers might also want students to build sentences on their own, using the stats to think critically about how they've done and analyzing how well they perform at different levels.

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Sentence Builder for iPad teaches students about grammar and descriptive writing through the process of creating sentences. After selecting from three different levels of play, students are shown a few columns of words and a picture. They'll use one word from the columns, in a grammatically correct way, to describe the picture. 

While creating these descriptive sentences, students will get practice ensuring that subjects agree with verbs, that pronouns match with antecedents, and that verbs agree in tense and number, among other important grammar skills. They'll also learn to pay attention to details. For example, they may see a picture of a cow holding balls and create the sentence "The cow is holding four orange balls," only to have it marked incorrect because the cow is only holding three green balls. Stats track how many sentences students attempt and whether sentences were formed correctly on the first, second, or third try.

Despite the silly graphics and sometimes cheesy animations, Sentence Builder for iPad has some solid academic potential. As students build sentences, they'll encounter simple grammatical mistakes and common areas of confusion. By design, the app seems to set students up to choose from options that contain mistakes often made by emerging readers and writers. It also gives them opportunities to learn from these mistakes, albeit intuitively and through trial and error.

When students build a sentence correctly, they'll not only see the correct sentence, but they'll also hear it pronounced out loud. Unfortunately, Sentence Builder doesn't include specific rules or explanations to help students understand why certain sentences are correct. An added component that helps students understand the why behind the rules of grammar would be a nice touch that could greatly improve the app's learning potential.

Overall Rating

Engagement Would it motivate students and hold their interest? Is it visually appealing? Would it inspire teachers to try something new or change their instruction?

Although the concept is a solid way to get students using language, the game is quite basic and could use better images, animations, and narration to really engage. More ways to play might also do the trick.

Pedagogy Does the tool help teachers promote a more student-centered experience? Will students gain conceptual understanding or think critically? Does it deepen teachers’ pedagogical thinking?

Instead of simply identifying parts of speech, students put them to use creating sentences. Sentence structure and difficulty vary by level, and -- though not explicitly -- some complex grammatical concepts are addressed.

Support Can students and teachers get assistance when they need it? Is it created with people of different abilities and backgrounds in mind? Is learning reinforced and extended beyond the digital experience?

Teachers get data on how many sentences students formed correctly at each level and how many attempts it took them. However, there's no data given on specific skills or parts of speech. Also, getting started is a bit tricky.


Common Sense reviewer
Stacy Zeiger Homeschooling parent

Community Rating

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Featured review by
Marcello S. , Classroom teacher
Classroom teacher
Rocketship Mateo Sheedy Elementary School
San Jose, United States
Great tool for building grammar and speaking skills
The basic structure is a great idea and implementation is spot on. Although overall it is not super visually appealing and kids will eventually tire of the repetition. The animations are wonky, but in an endearing way (at least for me and my students). The levels are great and work well to scaffold kids slowly up to more difficult sentences. It would be nice to have an option where kids just type in the correct answer to add difficulty. I do love that after the sentences are correct their is a audible r ...
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