Teacher Review For ST Math: K-5

Engaging, but sometimes difficult math learning without long winded directions

Gabrielle G.
Classroom teacher
John Muir Elementary School
Seattle, WA
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My Grades 2
My Subjects English Language Arts, Math, Science, Social Studies
My Rating 4
Learning Scores
Engagement 4
Pedagogy 5
Support 3
My Students Liked It Yes
My Students Learned Yes
I Would Recommend It Yes
Setup Time More than 15 minutes
Great for Further application
Homework
Individual
Knowledge gain
Practice
Great with Advanced learners
ELL
General
Low literacy
How I Use It
We are supposed to be using it 90 minutes a week, it is really hard to get those minutes because we have 30 minutes of computer lab time a week and a half a day with the ipad cart-but my students stamina is only for about 30 minutes with Jiji. So we have been using it full class while I print out the report sheets of people who are struggling and I check in with them as they are working. I also confer with students who have the yellow screens, which mean they are working on a hurdle or something that is hard for them. I have other coworkers who use this at a math workshop station. I have not moved to workshop with Jiji yet because I am afraid that students will get stuck and get frustrated. I look forward to using it in workshop rotation in a month or so. At the higher levels sometimes it is hard to know what Jiji is supposed to do if you have not watched the directions.
My Take
I've been using ST Math (lovingly called Jiji due to the penguin) now for two months in my classroom. I think that it is giving my students good practice in developing basic skills that build on each other. I can access reports that tell me who is getting low post tests, who is off task, and who is struggling a lot. Also on the computer or ipad screens it shows yellow around the screens when a student is struggling so you can help/focus them. I think that sometimes the multistep directions of some of the games is too much for some of my students (especially ones with special needs)-example: first students must skip count by 5's, but then they are putting in how much money they need with dimes and pennies. Most of the kids really like it and it keeps most of them engaged until they are at a hurdle. It is great that there are not wordy descriptions, so for my class with many ELL students they are not struggling due to the language element. We are trained to ask questions to the students about what they have previously encountered with Jiji to help them come to the solution and sometimes it is very difficult to guide students in that method.