Updated October 2014

PBS LearningMedia: The March @50

Five insightful videos on the legacy of the 1963 March on Washington

Subjects & skills
Skills
  • Critical Thinking

Subjects
  • Social Studies
Grades This grade range is a recommendation by Common Sense Education and not the developer/publisher.
6-12
Common Sense says (See details)
Not yet reviewed
Teachers say (1 Review)

Take a look inside

3 images

The March @50 is a five-episode Web series on the state of African-American civil rights in the United States since the March on Washington in 1963. While these 7- to 10-minute videos don't include pre-made lesson plans, they’re short enough to be easily dropped into one of your existing lessons on the Civil Rights Movement in general, or on the March in particular. The five episodes cover such important topics as jobs, voting rights, segregation, black-male incarceration, and the Movement’s legacy. They’re brief, thoughtful, and flexible enough to be useful for a debate or writing prompt, or as a warm-up to inspire further class discussion. Keep in mind that these videos are only streamed; they’re not available for download like some other resources on the PBS LearningMedia site. 

The site also links to several other PBS LearningMedia resources, including the Civil Rights collection, the Freedom Riders series, the civil rights and civil liberties sections of the Supreme Court series, and a larger March on Washington feature. This last connection might be the most valuable: Use lesson plans, images, and videos from the larger site, as well as the March @50 collection to supplement and extend your students' learning.

Continue reading Show less

Teacher Reviews

(See all 1 reviews) (1 reviews) Write a review
Featured review by
Amy K. , Classroom teacher
Classroom teacher
Cornell Senior High School
Coraopolis, PA
Contemporary and classic footage interspersed for compelling short videos

Even the most important historical footage can come off as dry or boring to students who are used to fast-paced, slick media that they can consume on their various devices at the drop of a hat. This video series does a good job of taking that historical footage, and cutting it with modern interviews and narration in a way that both respects the historical importance and draws in the modern teenage viewer. The content is both informative and thought provoking, and the segments can be used all at once, spread out, or used in part. All five parts are compelling and focus on different aspects of the March, and their contemporary state. For instance, one segment focuses on jobs. I appreciate this because many people remember the part about a dream, but forget about the jobs and housing equality. This video series does a great job of giving a comprehensive look at the focus of the March on Washington, and doesn't reduce it to one (albeit important) line.

Read full review