Teacher Review For Math Snacks

Animated Fun and Follow-Up

Nolan v.
La Sierra University
Riverside, CA
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My Rating 4
Learning Scores
Engagement 4
Pedagogy 4
Support 5
My Students Liked It Yes
My Students Learned Yes
I Would Recommend It Yes
Setup Time Less than 5 minutes
Great for Individual
Knowledge gain
Practice
Small group
Student-driven work
Teacher-led lessons
Whole class
How I Use It
I used this product as a test for my Graduate level class. Specifically, I played and explored two separate games/activities found on their free website: (a) Bad Date; and (b) Overruled. Both activities explored the idea of ratios in a fun way. First, the students need to watch the video for fun. Next, the class should play the video a second time in order to pay close attention to the various math concepts to be explored. After, the teacher reviews the introduced vocabulary with the class followed with a group activity found in the Learner's Guide(s). This process seems to be a good way to engage the class and then experience the concept. Following Bad Date, the teacher asked the class to divide into groups of 2 to 3 and talk among themselves recording the amount of words each person used. Once all the students finished the instructor recorded all the date on the board and then asked the class various questions about the rations--paying careful attention to explain how ratios and differences are two separate math concepts. Meanwhile, after Overruled, the class measured several different objects in class using the King's and Queen's feet, graphed the data, and observed the ratio as a straight line. Once they observed what a ratio is in the real world, the class then discussed other possible applications for ratios and measurement.
My Take
I think Math Snacks is a good free resource to use in class. I thought the graphics and ideas were a great way to introduce student's to the math concept to be explored. Moreover, activities following the video are excellent in engaging students towards experiential learning. In my opinion, math really makes the most sense when people, children or adults understand its practical, real world effects and applications.