Review by Fayme Evenson, Common Sense Education | Updated October 2017

Kudos Reading

Book club site supports student discussion, requires teacher prep

Subjects & skills
Skills
  • Communication & Collaboration
  • Critical Thinking

Subjects
  • English Language Arts
Grades This grade range is a recommendation by Common Sense Education and not the developer/publisher.
1-8
Common Sense says (See details)
Teachers say (0)
Not yet reviewed

Take a look inside

9 images

Pros: The class-only book discussion helps students learn to use social media appropriately.

Cons: Built-in games require teachers to upload words and definitions first; mature books slip through content filters.

Bottom Line: It's worth investigating for teachers looking for a classroom-style Goodreads where students can discuss books, but watch out for mature books.

English teachers work hard to create literature circles where each student has a role; they do this to provide the structures and support for students to become proficient at academic discussions surrounding texts. While literature circles are still a valid way to extend thinking, discussion, and study of a text, Kudos Reading offers an online twist by facilitating these discussions over the web. Use Kudos Reading as an extension to any assigned literature in class to obtain visible evidence of learning and discussion that just wouldn't be possible or true of a classroom group discussion. The feedback the teacher can offer will be more descriptive and useful to students.

Teachers will want to model what a proficient discussion looks like to build valuable digital citizenship skills alongside reading skills. To do so, make sure to add engaging discussion questions -- the paid version includes premade questions --  for club members to answer alongside their reading, and, if you want, add tricky vocabulary that students might struggle with throughout the text. Once responses come in, teachers (and students) can comment to model constructive feedback. Teachers may also want to grade students' responses using the built-in feature, but based on a rubric teachers create since there aren't any rubrics included. While Kudos Reading isn't meant to replace classroom conversations, once teachers have modeled and practiced in the classroom, it can be a great place to gradually release that responsibility to students.

 

Continue reading Show less

Kudos Reading is a social reading platform for classrooms, kind of like Goodreads, but private to a group of students and a teacher. There are books for almost every English teacher, whether you are a first grade teacher or a teacher of seniors in high school; however, the site's design definitely skews younger. Book Clubs are Kudos Reading's term for groups of students who are all reading and discussing the same book. These clubs can be customized with teacher-created discussion questions. There's also a bank of premade questions available with a subscription. After students respond to questions, teachers and students can comment on the responses and vote them up as with social media posts. Students can browse books, rate them, add them to reading lists, and make book recommendations to classmates. These social aspects of the platform make Kudos Reading a more authentic experience than some competitors.

To get started, teachers log in and then create an avatar (students do as well), and then they set up a class or Book Club. Click on the Books tab to browse books by genre, by grade level, or, after you've rated a number of books, by suggestion. Teachers then select a book, invite students (either manually from an existing class list or by signing kids up, or by providing students with a code), and create discussion questions or vocab lists. At any time, teachers can click on the Book Clubs tab to edit the club, participate in discussion with students, or give grades to discussions. If teachers have built a word list (words with their definitions), then teachers and students can use the Quest feature which auto-generates games -- word searches, unscrambles, crosswords, drawing, or word matches -- based on the teacher-created word list. 

Continue reading Show less

Students will love the freedom they have to discuss and carry on conversations with their group members, and the focus on social media-style discussion of the books can support passionate reading. If teachers take the time to create them, students will also appreciate the connected educational games that accompany each book. Teachers still have to do a fair amount of prep, however. Kudos Reading does not offer prep or tutorials that help students participate responsibly in online discussions, so this falls into the teacher's lap. There's also no built-in dictionary for generating word lists. While there are opportunities for grading discussions, it'd be helpful if Kudos Reading provided a variety of standards-aligned rubrics for assessing student discussions. Finally, while there is some content filtering (curse words as well as terms like "sex" are omitted), we did find inappropriate and mature books while using a student account. Students can only see the covers and synopses of these books, but finding them may still lead to some giggling or awkward conversation.

That said, when it comes to reading platforms, students need ways to use technology to support and advance their learning, not distract from it or sour the joy of reading with quizzes and canned texts. Kudos Reading, by focusing on social discussion and real books kids love, doesn't fall prey to these less-engaging aspects of online reading platforms.

Continue reading Show less
Overall Rating
3

Engagement Is the product stimulating, entertaining, and engrossing? Will kids want to return?
3

There's a wide array of reading choices and a fairly kid-friendly design, but the book search could be better.

Pedagogy Is learning content seamlessly baked-in, and do kids build conceptual understanding? Is the product adaptable and empowering? Will skills transfer?
3

Students can discuss books and curated reading lists while learning valuable digital citizenship skills.  The content filtering lets through some mature books, and there's no built-in dictionary for generating vocab lists.

Support Does the product take into account learners of varying abilities, skill levels, and learning styles? Does it address both struggling and advanced students?
3

The paid version includes a discussion question bank, and the auto-generated games are useful. However, the site could use better onboarding to orient students in particular.


Teacher Reviews

There aren’t any teacher reviews yet. Be the first to review this tool.

Write a review