Updated May 2014

Flocabulary: Language Arts

Add a beat and a rhyme to students' language arts learning

Subjects & skills
  • English Language Arts

  • Communication & Collaboration
  • Critical Thinking
Grades This grade range is a recommendation by Common Sense Education and not the developer/publisher.
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Teachers say (5 Reviews)

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Flocabulary’s Language Arts program can be a fun go-to when the usual tricks no longer work. These smart songs and high-quality videos will capture kids’ interest from the first “Yes-yes, y’all!" They'll also offer plenty of teachable moments, even for the most hip-hop-reluctant teacher. You can take well-worn topics like the parts of speech, the five-paragraph essay, or the elements of fiction, and transform them into memorable songs that kids will beg to hear again. Go for the Reading and Writing and Grammar units first; these are treasure troves of material for mini-lessons. After that, the Literature and Research Skills lessons make for a fantastic way to introduce new material while building excitement and curiosity.

One of the site’s most notable features is the guide to writing and filming academic hip-hop songs. This option may be the site's best way to keep high school students engaged no matter what they're learning -- be it grammar, the research process, a novel, or a play. The Reading and Writing, Grammar, Literature, and Research Skills units all have printable lyrics, online exercises, and recommended extensions. However, these units are broadly assigned to either the K-12 or the 6-12 grade bands, so you may need to do some differentiation.

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Teacher Reviews

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Featured review by
Lisa M. , Classroom teacher
Classroom teacher
Tamanend Middle School
Warrington, PA
Engaging, motivating and exciting . . . my classes come alive with the sound of rap!
I think Flocabulary is an excellent resource. It adds life and pizazz to ELA lessons that might be more difficult to present (parts of speech, point of view, types of verbs). We know that our students are able to memorize line after line of their favorite songs, so why not tap into this ability for our own purposes? By using Flocabulary, I can address different modalities and serve my visual and auditory learners better. Awesome resource! Read full review