Lesson Plan

U.S. Immigration

Students are introduced to the importance of evaluating sources before trusting them to be factual. They are then asked to analyze two sources on U.S. immigration for patterns and information, before making a decision as to their truthfulness.
Laura L.
Director of Teacher Happiness
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Objectives

What is True?

Students will be able to determine whether a source can be trusted by assessing its credibility, audience, accuracy, and value.

Students will be able to apply researching and analyzing skills to discuss the current debate over U.S. immigration policy.

 

Subjects
English Language Arts
Social Studies
Grades 6 - 9
All Notes
Teacher Notes
Student Notes

1 Hook/Anticipatory Set

Activity: Conversing

Introduce the purpose of the lesson for the day:

When debating or discussing a topic, no matter what it is, you want to be able to support your opinion with credible research and real-world examples. When citing digital sources you have to be extra careful because not all sites are written and fact-checked by experts, which means that the site might include aspects of bias, information that is either untrue or outdated, or simply irrelevant in supporting your claim.

Today we are going to practice how to assess a source before using the information in an argument to not only make sure that what you are saying is factual, but to be sure it won't  be proved wrong later, and ultimately make you look silly and uninformed.

Student Instructions

Turn to the person next to you and see if you can come up with a few examples of information  that was shared either in the news or on social media that was ultimately proven to be wrong by facts. How did this affect your opinion of the person who made the statement or the likelihood of you citing them as a source moving forward? What was the effect of the miss-shared information?

 

2 Direct Instruction and Guided Practice

Have students log in. As a class, you can either lead the students through the instructions together or invite them to work at their own pace. Use these guiding questions below to better define the vocabulary used on slide 2.

  1. Credibility: How trustworthy are these sources? Are the sources quality, or do they have something to gain from presenting biased information?
  2. Audience: Who is this site meant to reach? Is the author motivated to sell a product or are they reporting on facts.
  3. Accuracy: Are these facts that can be supported by other sources? If it hasn't been updated recently would that matter?
  4. Value: Does this source help you support what you are trying to prove?

Grab a free version of this assignment here to personalize with your students. 

New to Classkick? Watch this short video to find out how you can view all of your students' screens at one time and share student and teacher feedback instantly as they engage in this lesson either independently, in partners, or whole group. 

Student Instructions

Please log-in to view instructions and complete the questions online. Be ready to discuss two points with your classmates: 

  1. How trustworthy were these sources? Use the guiding questions we discussed to support your reasoning.
  2. Comment on the viewpoints being portrayed by various politicians about the U.S. immigration policy in light of what you have read. Have your opinions changed at all since you began your research? Use the guiding questions at the bottom of each question if you get stuck!

 

3 Independent Practice

Activity: Investigating

To have the students independently practice assessing sites/articles 

Have  students search for an article/video that supports the other two sources and write a detailed explanation of why it is a credible source.

Modification: Teacher will provide two links for students to read and assess whether or not the site's are credible.

Student Instructions

Use the guidelines we have discussed to search for a  resource that supports your argument. Write a detailed explanation to support why your source should be considered trustworthy.

4 Wrap-up

Activity: Assessing

Exit Slip/Extension Opportunities:

Use these extension questions to either have students: write a brief short answer on a note card as an exit slip, write an extended response citing evidence to support their reasoning, debate their answer to further investigate the topic.

If you were to complete a digital search would you find that most resources are trustworthy? What do you think the reasoning of this to be?

Can a personal blog be considered a trustworthy resource to cite?

What are the consequences of not practicing responsible reporting on the Internet?

 

 

Student Instructions

If you were to complete a digital search would you find that most resources are trustworthy? What do you think the reasoning of this to be?

Can a personal blog be considered a trustworthy resource to cite?

What are the consequences of not practicing responsible reporting on the Internet?