Lesson Plan

To Read or Not to Read! Creating a Book Talk

Students will choose a book in their reading range and present a Book Talk using VoiceThread.
Carolyn B.
Classroom teacher
Cameron Elementary School
Cameron, TX
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My Grades 4
My Subjects English Language Arts
Objectives

Students will be able to...4.9A - Read independently for a sustained period of time and paraphrase what the reading was about, maintaining meaning and logical order (e.g., generate a reading log or journal; participate in book talks).

Subjects
English Language Arts
discussion
letter or word recognition
reading
reading comprehension
speaking
text analysis
Grades 4
All Notes
Teacher Notes
Student Notes

1 Hook

Activity: Presenting — Direct Instruction

Activities:

Students will choose an appropriate book in his/her reading range. They will read the book and complete a recorded Book Talk through VoiceThread. Students will write up their broadcast using a preset form from the teacher. The broadcast must have all the components of a good Book Talk. Students also will choose another visual project to turn in for a grade. Students will be give rubrics that will be used to grade the complete project. Also, students will be given a rubric on how well they listen to other students' presentations.

2 Guided Practice

Activity: Presenting — Project Information for Students

                                 What is a Book Talk?

A book talk is like a short T.V. commercial, advertising a book.
The goal is to get the reader interested so they want to read your book!
How to Give a Book Talk
•    Look at the audience
•    Speak loudly so all can hear.
•    Talk about the characters, the problem in the story, or some interesting information.
•    Read a small part of the book to interest the readers
To Prepare:
•    Choose a book that you think others would like!
•    Read the book so that you are comfortable sharing what you know about it.
•    Practice!
•    Jot a few notes down to remember the important information you wanted to share and the questions you wanted to ask
•    Bookmark a page you wanted to read so you can easily find it.
A Good Book Talk Might Include:
•    Talking about the title and the author
•    Showing the cover and some illustrations.
•    Reading aloud the introduction, back of the book, or an interesting part of the book.
•    Connecting the book to your classmates’ lives.
•    Posing questions
•    Giving a brief summary of the book
•    Connecting the book to other books your class has read or liked
•    Telling a little about the plot or about one character
•    Sharing your own response to the book
•    Remember- Don’t give away any secrets or the book’s ending…you don’t want to ruin the book!

Here’s a list of activities that allow a student to show understanding of a book and that might be enjoyable. This selection of activities is also intended to meet the needs of different kinds of learners -- or to contribute to the development of skills beyond writing. I often allowed students choice in deciding how they wanted to respond to a book.

Activities to use for Book Talk Project:

1. Letter to the Author: If a book really moved a student, he might be interested in writing a letter to the author. There might be more information he'd like ("Did any of this really happen to you?") or he might want to share his reflections and thoughts about the book. It's no uncommon for authors to respond -- and that's a thrilling experience for a kid. This kind of assignment helps you assess how a student connected with a book and responded to it.

2. Review for Peers: This could be done in writing (and posted online somewhere including Amazon.com) or it could be shared verbally with a class. This is a way for students to practice persuasive writing and to share their opinions.

3. A New Cover: Creating a different cover for the book is a great project for artistic students. They might use traditional mediums -- paper, markers, and so on, or those with the skills and resources could create one using digital tools. This assignment is really a persuasive one: we all judge books by their covers, so how can students communicate their thoughts and feelings about a book through an image?

Here’s a list of activities that allow a student to show understanding of a book and that might be enjoyable. This selection of activities is also intended to meet the needs of different kinds of learners -- or to contribute to the development of skills beyond writing. I often allowed students choice in deciding how they wanted to respond to a book.

                                   Activities to use for Book Talk Project:

1. Letter to the Author: If a book really moved a student, he might be interested in writing a letter to the author. There might be more information he'd like ("Did any of this really happen to you?") or he might want to share his reflections and thoughts about the book. It's no uncommon for authors to respond -- and that's a thrilling experience for a kid. This kind of assignment helps you assess how a student connected with a book and responded to it.

2. Review for Peers: This could be done in writing (and posted online somewhere including Amazon.com) or it could be shared verbally with a class. This is a way for students to practice persuasive writing and to share their opinions.

3. A New Cover: Creating a different cover for the book is a great project for artistic students. They might use traditional mediums -- paper, markers, and so on, or those with the skills and resources could create one using digital tools. This assignment is really a persuasive one: we all judge books by their covers, so how can students communicate their thoughts and feelings about a book through an image?