Lesson Plan

The Art of An Argument

Student will learn that when taking sides in an argument, it is important to start weighing the reasons and evidence offered up by both sides, remaining open, suspending judgement so as to develop a considered opinion.
Cherell D.
Classroom teacher
Louise Radloff Middle School
Duluth, United States
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My Grades 6, 7, 8
My Subjects English Language Learning
Objectives

Students will be able to write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.

Students will be able to read texts from reliable sources on both sides of an issue and then take a stance on the issue.

Students will be able to engage collaboratively in group and one-on-one discussions.

 

Subjects
English Language Arts
Grades 6 – 8
All Notes
Teacher Notes
Student Notes

1 Hook- Step 1

YouTube
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 Present the students with a warm-up that consist of a video clip and a graphic organizer for the students to discuss the video clip then share out. The students will watch a youtube video " Kid President Is over it" as a warm-up.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ghk-nDJB3Tk.

They will watch the video and write down their noticing and what was the message Kid president was trying to convey. they will then discuss this with their neighbor, and share out what they agreed upon with the whole group.

Student Instructions

Students will watch Kid Presidents' youtube video titled " Kid President is over it".  The students will complete a graphic organizer with their peer titled " Think Pair and Share". The students will write what they thought Kid presidents message was, and then they will discuss and write what they shared with each other. They need to identify differences and similarities. Finally, they will choose what they would like to share with the group. 

2 Direct Instruction- Teaching Point

Activity: Presenting

Instruct the student to gather in the group area and state that: I want to teach you that when taking sides in an argument, it is important to start weighing the reasons and evidence offered up by both sides, remaining open, suspending judgment so as to develop a considered opinion. And sometimes that opinion may change given the facts.

Today I am going to show you a system for taking notes on evidence by using PROS, CONS, and OTHER.

Say this first:  There are arguments that are not personal-arguments that involve middle school students across the nation or the world. Is it okay to have cell phones in school? Should kids wear uniforms? Should schools start later in the morning? * I’m going to suggest that we discuss another issue-one that is being debated all over the country. Should kids be involved in competitive sports? There is an argument that competitive sports can be harmful to kids. They create lots of pressure, kids get left out, and sports injuries are a big deal. Try to imagine how that side of an argument might go. * Writer’s people all around the country are talking about this issue. Some places have even decided not to keep score in kids’ sports! This issue involves you. So let your voices be heard. Let’s see how you influence this decision.

Student Instructions

Students will gather in the meeting area for 7-10 minutes while the teacher gives direct instruction by giving examples of arguments and modeling note taking and the practice of taking notes on evidence by using the pros, cons, and other information presented to form an argument.

3 Guided Practice-We Do As A Group- 15 Minutes

Penzu Classroom
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Project Text on the whiteboard and give students a copy for themselves to follow along with while using an annotation guide. The students will use computers and log onto Penzu-classroom to begin taking notes.

TEXT- “Listening to Wisdom from a 10-Year Old Son about His Head Injury.”

The teacher will read aloud the Title and ask the students to based on the title-thumbs up if you think that this will give you evidence to support the PRO position-that competitive sports are good for kids. Thumbs down if you think it might support the CON position. Now, thumbs to the side if you think it might have some evidence to support both pro and con.

The teacher will read the first paragraph and demonstrate note-taking with an annotation guide and Penzu- classroom.

Next, the students will work with a partner, complete the note-taking chart.

 Teacher will instruct the students: BEFORE YOU BEGIN: Note the following before establishing your position-

Set up your note-taking system

Find sources on both sides of the issue

Read the title and decide which side the author seems to support, and file your evidence either in the FOR or AGAINST the issue (or other)

Read closely, be alert to evidence/ideas that inform the argument, and pause to record especially important evidence

Student Instructions

The students will listen as the teacher reads the title and they will decide which side the author seems to support. They will respond by giving a thumbs up or thumbs down to demonstrate their prediction on the article being PRO or CON.

Once the students decide which side the author seems to support, and file their evidence either in the FOR or AGAINST the issue (or other) They will read closely, be alert to evidence/ideas that inform the argument and pause to record especially important evidence in the note-taking program Penzu- Classroom.

4 Independent Practice- You Do

Penzu Classroom
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The teacher will tell the students: Did you see what we did that you could do on your own? We took in the information from the text, thought about which side of the debate it helped-and we really had to think about it. It wasn’t always obvious. Then we jotted that information onto the correct section of our notes so that we could use it later when we write our arguments. I know that none of you are sure yet what position you’ll take in this debate, but you need to collect the information that this author presents-to document this perspective-whether or not it matches your own initial gut feelings.

Teacher will then instruct students to 

-On your own, read the article, “Get Off That Couch and Play!” (Thumbs up if you think that this will be FOR*PRO competitive sports or thumbs down if you think it will be AGAINST*CON them.”)

-Remember to collect details that clearly support both sides of the issue using your system.

-Also, remember to use quotation marks around direct quotes so as not to plagiarize. :)

-The teacher will instruct students to create all notes using Penzu-Classroom.

Student Instructions

Students should read 

On your own, read the article, “Get Off That Couch and Play!” (Thumbs up if you think that this will be FOR*PRO competitive sports or thumbs down if you think it will be AGAINST*CON them.”)

-Remember to collect details that clearly support both sides of the issue using your system.

-Also, remember to use quotation marks around direct quotes so as not to plagiarize. :)

-Students will write all notes using Penzu-Classroom

5 Wrap -UP

Penzu Classroom
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The teacher will instruct the students to use the information that they have gathered to determine the position they have taken after reading both articles.  The students will write their claim and have a 5-minute debate with a partner.

Student Instructions

The students to use the information that they have gathered to determine the position they have taken after reading both articles. The students will write their claim and have a 5-minute debate with a partner.

6 Optional-Homework-Enrichment

For Homework,

1. The student will play the game argument wars on Brainpop. 

https://www.brainpop.com/games/argumentwars

2. The student will use what they have observed in the author's style of writing and how they have portrayed their point of view of text that was read in class today to create an argument of their own. The students will write their own argument in which they create a  clear argument, give reasons, supporting claims and opposing views, a rebuttable and conclusion.

 

Student Instructions

For Homework,

1. The student will play the game argument wars on Brainpop. 

https://www.brainpop.com/games/argumentwars

2. The student will use what they have observed in the author's style of writing and how they have portrayed their point of view of text that was read in class today to create an argument of their own. The students will write their own argument in which they create a  clear argument, give reasons, supporting claims and opposing views, a rebuttable and conclusion.