Lesson Plan

Surviving A Planet’s Atmosphere and Environmental Conditions

Students will use iPads to conduct a Socrative review of the planets before selecting a planet to research and survive on during a two-week visit. The student will create a Telagami weather broadcast and a journal entry describing survival on the planet.
Jacqueline B.
Classroom teacher
Clearfield Alliance Christian School
Clearfield, PA
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My Grades 5, 6
My Subjects English Language Arts, Math, Science, Social Studies, Health & Wellness
Objectives

The student will be able to identify the weather conditions of the planets. The student will be able to describe ways he/she will adapt and survive a selected planet’s conditions. The student will be able to create a weather report and an exploration log of a two-week visit of the planet. The student will be able to reason what he/she experiences based on research and learning. PA Common Core Science Standard S.3.3.4.B1: Identify planets in our solar system and their basic characteristics. PA Common Core Science Standards: S4.B.2.1.2: Explain how specific adaptations can help a living organism survive (e.g., protective coloration, mimicry, leaf sizes and shapes, ability to catch or retain water).

Subjects
Science
Grades 5 - 6
All Notes
Teacher Notes
Student Notes

1 Hook/Attention Getter

Distribute iPads to pairs of students. Guide students to the quiz using the code: SOC-18118850. Make students think about the temperature, atmosphere, and conditions of the planets of the solar system as you take them question-by-question through the quiz. Students will begin with lower order thinking skills and finish with higher order thinking skills.

Student Instructions

Answer the questions as the class goes through each question. Think about how temperature, atmosphere, and conditions of each planet would impact survival.

2 Direct Instruction

Help students navigate to find and list facts about each planet’s temperature, atmospheric conditions, hours of sunlight, surface conditions, and other pertinent information. Model how to evaluate what other information is pertinent. You and the students will help students to find the information for the planets and record them on the board for easy reference. Formative Assessment: Watch for what students deem important to record and guide students to refocus on what is important to the lesson and what is interesting yet not pertinent to the research. Watch for students who are struggling to navigate the website or use the iPad. Help these students to deter frustration and misbehavior while building success. Those who are struggling will use one picture for the background of the Tellagami video in the next step. Those students who aren’t struggling will be challenged to make a collage for the background.

Student Instructions

Research each planet’s temperature, atmospheric conditions, hours of sunlight, and surface conditions. Decide what is important and what is interesting yet unrelated to the research topic. Share your research findings to make a class list of facts about each planet.

3 Guided Practice

Tellagami
Free, Free to Try

Tell students to pick a planet to pretend to live on for two weeks. Ask students to think about the temperature, atmosphere, and general living conditions of the planet that were discovered from the research. Ask students what supplies they might need to survive the two-week stay. Ask students if a weather report would help them know what to pack and how to prepare for the trip. Introduce the weather report Tellagami video project. Explain the criteria of background, temperature, atmosphere, general living conditions, and one item needed to survive and why it is needed. Guide students to write a 20-second prompt that meets all criteria for the report. Help students to create a Tellagami video for the weather report. Use the formative assessment from the last step to help students select a photo or create a collage for the background of their weather report. Help students design and move their reporter. Guide students to record a 20-second prompt that meets all criteria for the report while speaking clearly for others to understand the weather report. Help students save and share their videos. Watch everyone’s weather reports and give constructive compliments and critiques.

Student Instructions

Pick a planet to live on for two weeks. Write a weather report that includes the name of the planet and information about its temperature, atmosphere, and general living conditions. Make sure your report includes the something the viewer will need to use to survive a trip to the planet and why. Choose a photo of the planet or make a collage with the teacher’s help. Create a weather reporter and help those around you who are having trouble. Ask the teacher for help to save and share the video so it isn’t erased. Give positive compliments and critiques after watching classmates’ weather videos.

4 Independent Practice

Activity: Creating

Introduce the idea of a travel log. Tell students they will write a journal entry about living on the selected planet for two weeks. Students must include facts about the temperature, the atmosphere, and the general living conditions of the planet. Students must also name two supplies they must use and describe why they need those supplies. Guide students to use their imaginations and make the journal entry interesting so others will want to hear of their adventures. Caution students to make sure the journal entry’s focus is on the facts of the exploration and not on alien encounters and other distracting, imaginative events. Help students to keep their imaginations reined in while focusing on the facts.

Student Instructions

Write a journal letter describing the two-week survival on your selected planet. Do not be so imaginative as to become off topic with things such as crazy alien encounters. Include the planet’s name, temperature, atmosphere, general living conditions, and two examples of survival gear you used. Explain why you needed the gear and how you used it. Double check CUPS (capitalization, usage, punctuation, and spelling).

5 Wrap Up

Activity: Presenting

Have students read their journal entries after everyone has completed the assignment. Have students provide peers with positive compliments and reactions to the adventures in the journal entries. Summative Assessment: Journal entries will be graded based upon the provision of the planet’s name, a fact on its temperature, atmosphere, general living conditions, and two examples of survival equipment. Students must provide reasoning as to why the equipment is needed. Students should be creative while staying on topic. The journals will also be assessed for correct grammar and spelling.

Student Instructions

Share your journal entries with the class. Give classmates positive compliments and reactions to the adventures they have created.