Lesson Plan

MAKE a Makey Makey(!) Controller for Scratch

Time Frame: about three 40 minute sessions Subject: Design Club, Technology Grade Level: Grade 4 to 12
Anthony C.
Technology coordinator
Bayview Glen
Toronto, ON
Show More
My Grades 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12
My Subjects English Language Arts, Math, Science, Social Studies, Arts
Digitial Citizenship and EdTech Mentor
Objectives

Knowledge Goals: Students should be familiar with finding games in Scratch  

Students should be able to create a simple game with a controller in Scratch 

Students should be able to connect wires to controller (play doe) and to Makey Makey key 

Reasoning Goals: 
Students should be able de-bug programs and trouble shoot  

Skill Goals: 
Students should be able to create, iterate and share computer programs to create a external controller for their game 

Students should be self-directed learners who seek out new learning and opportunities to complete, improve and iterate projects  
(learner transformed) 

Product Goals: 
Students should be able to create, iterate and share a external controller using play doe and a playable game for their arcade 

Subjects
Science
engineering
electricity
Grades 4 - 12
All Notes
Teacher Notes
Student Notes

1 Hook: Essential Questions: What is computational thinking?

Questions specific to lessons  
 
What sort of controller should my game have? 

What sort of controller would benefit the end user in my game? 

Questions for all making and designing 
How can we prepare students for a programmable world? 

What programming skills are needed for individuals to survive and thrive in the internet of things? 

How can use computational thinking to solve challenges? 

How can I use computational thinking to help others?  
 
How can computational thinking aid my learning?

Student Instructions

Questions specific to lessons  
 
What sort of controller should my game have? 

What sort of controller would benefit the end user in my game? 

Questions for all making and designing 
How can we prepare students for a programmable world? 

What programming skills are needed for individuals to survive and thrive in the internet of things? 

How can use computational thinking to solve challenges? 

How can I use computational thinking to help others?  
 
How can computational thinking aid my learning?

2 Direct Instruction: Working with Scratch

Vocabulary 

program, de-bug, loops, iterate, commands, parallel processing, algorithms, logical reasoning, decomposition, patterns, remixing, abstraction,  modularization, reusing, remix

Teaching Strategies 

Direct Instruction: led by instructor when appropriate using projector and whiteboard 
Cooperative Grouping: students work in “critique groups” to assess projects 
Video Tutorials: students chosen to help learn specific skills 
Individual investigations: students look through Studios for projects with controllers 
Individual building: Students create their own project through Scratch

Assessment Evidence  
Assessment AS, OF, FOR… 
Assessment AS Learning -Product: External Technology Product 

Students create an external controller using Play Doe and Controllers.  

Assessment of Learning-Product: Technology Project 

Students create a Game using the Scratch software using studios, galleries and examples from lessons as a guide. 

POC (POC - What is it?) 

Rubric for assessment of Scratch projects (Only formally used in Unit 2,3,4 & mainly in Unit 5) 

Products– Students create an animation, story, games and their own project using Scratch 
Observations– Students record their progress in workbooks (De-bug it! and Design Notebook
Conversations– Students and teachers interact through commenting in Google Documents and in face to face situations, shared projects may receive feedback at an appropriate time from the moderated Scratch community

Resources 

6 Makey Makey kits including wires and USB connectors 
Lots of Playdoh

Software 
Scratch 2.0 (http://scratch.mit.edu
Web based – requires stable internet connection 

Scratch 1.4 (https://scratch.mit.edu/scratch_1.4/
(downloadable version (no internet), thin client and runs quickly on slower computer devices) 
 
Curriculum Resources 
 
Creative Computing Teachers Workbook –HERE 
Creative Computing Learners Workbook -HERE 
Rubric for assessment of Scratch projects  

Scratch cards -HERE 
Scratch posters -HERE 
Scratch video playlist –HERE

Student Instructions

In this step: Students to upload or curate created or found projects in a gallery for sharing and critical review and iteration (re-mixing) 

Overall: Students to become independent and self-directed learners who use computer programing languages like Scratch to purposefully create, design, learn and express their ideas and visions of the world around them 
 
Students can:   
   
Create and maintain an account at scratch.mit.edu. 
Access and use Scratch tutorials to aid their learning.  
Create Scratch projects using other projects and tutorials as guides  
Use a variety of blocks to create projects  
Access studios and re-mix the projects of others  
Solve and debug errors in programs individually, in small groups and occasionally as a whole class 
Curate projects on a particular computational theme (loops, if then statements, games, stories etc.) 
Create a studio with a personal collection of curated projects  

Create a Design Journal to reflect upon their own learning (metacognition) and dialogue with facilitator 
Students record their progress in workbooks (De-bug it! and Design Notebook
Collaborate with peers to create and critique projects  
Communicate effectively and persuasively about the purpose, audience, programming features and possible next steps for their Scratch program  
When appropriate, share projects with others for critical review

3 Guided Practice: Create own controller using PlayDoh and Makey Makey kit

Specific: Students to create an external controller using Play Doh and Makey Makey kit  

Students to create or select a game with a standard controller or a unique controller  

Students to upload or curate created or found projects in a gallery for sharing and critical review and iteration (re-mixing) 

Student Instructions

Specific: Students to create an external controller using Play Doh and Makey Makey kit  

Students to create or select a game with a standard controller or a unique controller  

Students to upload or curate created or found projects in a gallery for sharing and critical review and iteration (re-mixing) 

4 Independent Practice: Students create both a unique game in Scratch and a unique controller using Makey Makey

Students can choose to either create the controller, find and play a suitable game in Scratch or Create their own game in Scratch  

Differentiation by Outcome 

Use of Step-by-Step tutorials - Students might follow a tutorial (not ready yet (i.e. Pong) embedded in Scratch help section: These step-by-step guides are specific to projects and include some multimedia but are mostly text and graphics based.  

Differentiating by Readiness and Interest

Student Instructions

Students can choose to either create the controller, find and play a suitable game in Scratch or Create their own game in Scratch  

Differentiation by Outcome 

Use of Step-by-Step tutorials - Students might follow a tutorial (not ready yet (i.e. Pong) embedded in Scratch help section: These step-by-step guides are specific to projects and include some multimedia but are mostly text and graphics based.  

Differentiating by Readiness and Interest

5 Wrap Up: Arcade and Game Exhibition

Activity: Presenting

Students invite fellow creators, other peers, teachers, parents, administrators and other members of the public to play the game.

Create a feedback sheet where players can offer suggestions and ideas for next steps.

Each designer should have their work celebrated and appreciated with public recognition (applause and perhaps a certificate)

Student Instructions

Students invite fellow creators, other peers, teachers, parents, administrators and other members of the public to play the game.

Create a feedback sheet where players can offer suggestions and ideas for next steps.

Each designer should have their work celebrated and appreciated with public recognition (applause and perhaps a certificate)