Lesson Plan

Learning Scratch Together

This lesson will help your students learn to use Scratch as a community by creating and sharing help resources.
Jim L.
Technology coordinator
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My Grades 5, 6, 7, 8
My Subjects English Language Arts, Math, Science, Social Studies, Arts
Objectives

To help students understand the technology they use every day, we need to start providing those building blocks from an early age. Scratch is a great introduction to coding because the emphasis is not on learning syntax, but on learning coding logic. Scratch uses blocks of code that are placed together to create if/then statements, loops, Boolean expressions, and so on. This lesson focuses on students working together to create shared resources the group can use as a resouce when they need help. While creating this help resource, they are learning the basic tools of Scratch.

At the end of this lesson, students will be able to use Scratch as a programming tool by collecting shared resources, such as tutorial videos. These resources can be used later, when they are working on their next Scratch project and they need help with a specific tool. 

By working together as a collaborative community to create a shared resource, students are learning to work in an environment of shared knowledge.

After this lesson, students will be able to use the basic tools of Scratch, including:

  • change the appearance of a Sprite
  • move the Sprite
  • keep score
  • animate the Sprite

 

Subjects
Science
Grades 4 - 12
All Notes
Teacher Notes
Student Notes

1 Hook: Brainstorm Arcade Games

Google Drive
Free, Paid

Ask students to brainstorm arcade games that are simple and interactive (such as Pac Man). Teacher will record the responses in a shared Google Drive document. 

2 Direct Instruction: Exploring Scratch Help

Direct Instruction - Show students the basic tools of Scratch that they will be using (see the link going to the cards). Use links to tutorials on the Scratch Help page. Show the first Scratch card and work through it, demonstrating to students how to do this. 

http://scratch.mit.edu/help/cards/

Also, show a YouTube instructional video on how to do the first task...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6rZz7KrR_Z0

3 Guided Practice: Adding Tutorials

Move on to the second card on the Scratch Help page. Have students do the second card while you show them how to do the second card.

http://scratch.mit.edu/help/cards/

Have students search for a YouTube instructional video that describes how to do the second task. Ask a student to share a YouTube video that demonstrates the second task. Have student add a link to the shared Google Doc. Tell the students that when they find a good YouTube tutorial, they can add it to the shared Google Doc with a heading and description of the video.

Student Instructions

Search for a YouTube instructional video that describes how to do the second task in the list of cards on http://scratch.mit.edu/help/cards/.

Share a YouTube video that demonstrates the second task.

Add a link to the shared Google Doc. When you find a good YouTube tutorial, you can add it to the shared Google Doc with a heading and description of the video.

 

4 Independent Practice: Adding Tutorials

Ask students to continue working through the help cards on their own. They will continue to add information to the shared Google Doc.

Student Instructions

Continue working through the Scratch Help cards, one by one, on your own. You will continue to search for YouTube videos that match the cards and post them on the shared Google Doc. Be sure to add a title and short description for each YouTube video.

5 Closing

Google Drive
Free, Paid

After all the cards have been covered by most of the students, have everyone look at the shared Google Doc together, checking out a few of the videos. Ask why students found these specific videos helpful. 

Remind students that they will access this page in the future when they begin their next Scratch activity, which will be to create an arcade game in Scratch.