Lesson Plan

Identifying Numbers

An introductory lesson to numeracy.
Stephanie F.
Educational Technology Integration Consultant
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My Grades Pre-K, K, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12
My Subjects English Language Arts, Math, Science, Social Studies, Arts
Objectives

Students will be able to...

  • Learn why numbers are an important part of everyday life.
  • Provide examples of daily uses of numbers
Subjects
Math
Grades Pre-K - 1
All Notes
Teacher Notes
Student Notes

1 Hook/Attention Getter

Talk about the different ways we use numbers in our everyday lives. What are some uses of numbers? Why are numbers important?

Watch the following YouTube clip:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2naWinUSf6w

 

2 Direct Instruction

Have students walk around the classroom for 5 to 10 minutes and ask them to take pictures of examples of numbers they find in the room. Direct them to some less obvious ways numbers are used, such as on a clock or the number of paintbrushes in a jar, cubbies, or windows in the classroom.
Have students return to their desks and ask them these questions: Where do you see numbers? What are the numbers doing there? Are they measuring something, telling time, or representing a group?

3 Guided Practice

Activity: Conversing

After sharing what they found, ask students to imagine a world without numbers. What would it be like? How would things be different? How would school and their classroom be different? Give students a few minutes to think and share their thoughts with the class. Talk about the things that students do in a day. What things would be harder to do without numbers? How do numbers help them know when to go to school? How do numbers help them know how many plates to put on the dinner table? How do numbers help us know where to stand in a line? Help students come up with examples of ways they rely on numbers everyday.

4 Independent Practice

Have students draw a picture showing an example of a time they have used numbers. Give them some examples: standing first or last in line, dividing candy among friends, or having a doctor measure their height. All of these represent important uses of numbers in everyday life. More advanced students could write words or a sentence or two explaining their drawing.
When the drawings are complete, ask volunteers to share their work with the class. Occasionally have students reflect back on their drawings, so they can be reminded of the importance of numbers in their lives.

5 Wrap-Up/Evaluation

Activity: Assessing

Use the following three-point rubric to evaluate students' work during this lesson.

  • Three points:  Students were highly engaged in class discussions; were well behaved and on task while searching for examples of numbers in the classroom; and drew unique and colorful pictures that clearly identified an example of a way they use numbers in their everyday lives.
  • Two points:  Students participated in class discussions; were reasonably well behaved and generally on task while searching for examples of numbers in the classroom; and drew somewhat unique and colorful pictures that generally identified an example of a way they use numbers in their everyday lives.
  • One point:  Students participated minimally in class discussions; were unable to stay on task while searching for examples of numbers in the classroom; and drew incomplete or inaccurate pictures that did not identify an example of a way they use numbers in their everyday lives.