Lesson Plan

Evaluating Websites

Evaluating Websites
Kimberly N.
Classroom teacher
California Military Institute
Perris, United States
Show More
My Grades 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12
My Subjects English Language Arts, Arts
Objectives

Students will be able to...

  • understand what website extensions mean and what their bias is
  • use the CARS method to evaluate websites
  • will be able to effectively evaluate websites for credibility and usability

 

Subjects
English Language Arts
Social Studies
Grades 9 – 12
All Notes
Teacher Notes
Student Notes

1 Activating prior information

Activity: Conversing

Conversing

Put students into groups of four.

Ask students to think about the last thing they searched on the Internet. Put the following questions on the board:

What website did you go to?

What was the purpose of the search? Personal knowledge? School project?

Did you pay attention to the author of the website? Was that important for your purposes? Why or why not?

Give students 2 minutes to share their most recent Internet search with a shoulder partner. They should answer each of the questions that you have put on the board.

After 2 minutes, provide time for just a few students to share their discussion with the class.

Student Instructions

With your table group, discuss the following questions:

What website did you go to?

What was the purpose of the search? Personal knowledge? School project?

Did you pay attention to the author of the website? Was that important for your purposes? Why or why not?

2 Direct Instruction

Explain that today's lesson will teach students how to evaluate a source to use in a research project.

Tell students that while they are watching the videos, they should look for at least one new thing they didn't know and be ready to share with their group.

Show the video. Give students 2 minutes in their groups to share what new information they learned during the video.

After the video, discuss the CARS method using slide 1 of the Google slides presentation. 

Student Instructions

STUDENT INSTRUCTIONS

While you watch the videos, find at least one new thing about evaluating sources that you didn't already know. Be prepared to share this new knowledge with your group.

3 Directed practice

For directed practice, you will model how to evaluate a source with the CARS method. You may use the website in this lesson or find one of your own.

While you are going through each step, write your explanation on the document "CARS Practice". Students should write what you're writing. You can either attach this as an assignment in Google Classroom or print physical copies for each student.

Student Instructions

STUDENT INSTRUCTIONS

Listen to your teacher as she models how to use the CARS method to evaluate a source. As she completes the "CARS Practice" graphic organizer, you will complete yours.

4 Independent Practice

Students will now practice using the CARS method to evaluate a source. 

Using slide 2 of the Google slides presentation, students will scan one QR code and complete the graphic organizer from the guided practice activity. Within each group, two students should evaluate source 1 and the other two students should evaluate source 2.  On their graphic organizer, they should be writing evidence of each part of CARS that they find in the source.

Student Instructions

STUDENT INSTRUCTIONS

You and a partner will scan the QR code you have been assigned. Complete the graphic organizer together with evidence of each part of CARS you find in the source.

5 Wrap up

Activity: Other — Responding to QuikWrite question

Using a discussion post on Haiku LMS or notebook paper and allow students to respond to the following statement:

Explain why the source you evaluated was or was not a reliable and valid source.

Student Instructions

STUDENT INSTRUCTIONS

Log in to Haiku and respond to the Website Credibility discussion question or use notebook paper to respond to the following statement:

Explain why the source you evaluated was or was not a reliable and valid source.