Lesson Plan

Create your own Coming of Age film!

Use STORIFY to apply your understanding of coming-of-age films.
Mallory M.
Classroom teacher
Cobble Hill School of American Studies
Brooklyn, NY
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My Grades 9, 10, 11, 12
My Subjects English Language Arts, Arts
EdTech Mentor
Objectives

Students will be able to...

Write loglines to articulate the premise for their "coming-of-age" movies.

Use Storify to select images, GIFs, and music purposefully  to demonstrate understanding of literary elements (characterization, setting, conflict, climax, mood) and cinematic techniques (framing, lighting, and sound).

Identify criteria from models which they should  include in their own finished products.

Engage in self and peer-assessment of the finished products based on the class checklist/rubric.

 

Subjects
English Language Arts
Arts
English Language Learning
Grades 9 - 12
All Notes
Teacher Notes
Student Notes

1 Hook - Creating loglines for our stories!

Padlet
Free, Paid

1) Introduce the goal of this lesson: Tell students they will be applying  their understanding of key concepts from the "coming-of age" films/literature  we've studied by creating our own "coming-of-age" short films OR a few pages from a "director's notebook".  Tell students that, before they begin creating their "coming-of-age" films/ "director's notebook" using a site called Storify, they will first brainstorm the premise for their coming-of-age films by creating loglines. 

2) Think-pair-share or whole-class discussion:

Clarify/ explain what a LOGLINE is and how to write loglines by showing them a link such as this one: http://thewritepractice.com/great-logline/

 3) Then, on laptops (independently, in  partnerships, or small groups) have students search for sample loglines from their favorite teen movies and share them with the class by posting onto an interactive Padlet board. (Provide students with the link to the Padlet board.)

This form of sharing via Padlet allows students to see each other's responses which scaffolds the brainstorming process -- students can get ideas from other students'  posts on the Padlet board if they are initially stuck. )

4) After looking over the loglines from movies on the Padlet board, ask students students to  create and post a few potential loglines  for their own coming-of-age film/ director's notebook pages. 

Student Instructions

1) Today we will be applying your understanding of key concepts from the "coming-of age" films/literature  we've studied by creating our own "coming-of-age" short films OR a few pages from a "director's notebook".    BUT, before we begin creating our own "coming-of-age" films/ "director's notebooks" using a site called Storify,  we will first brainstorm the premise for their coming-of-age films by creating loglines. 

2) Think-pair-share: What is a logline? Identify some of the key criteria in a logline and explain why loglines be helpful to filmmakers.

3) Now, on your laptops: search for sample loglines from your  favorite teen movies and share them with the class by posting onto the interactive Padlet board I've created (see the Padlet board link  I've posted on the SmartBoard) 

4)Finally, create and post a few potential loglines  for your own coming-of-age film/ director's notebook pages. Clearly label these as your own loglines (as opposed to the loglines from movies in Step 3 above). 

2 Direct Instruction

Show students how to:

1) Log into Storify (https://storify.com/),  create a free account , and create a "New Story" by clicking on the green button on the far right of the screen. 

2)Next, demonstrate how to search for stories, images and/or music through Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, YouTube, Flickr, GIFs, Getty images, Google and SoundCloud. 

3)Tell/ show students that they have the option of connecting their own Facebook or Twitter account if they want to pull from their own lives directly when creating this story/director's notebook.

Student Instructions

Now I will provide you with some direct instruction for using the site Storify!

On your laptop/computer:

1) Log into Storify (https://storify.com/),  create a free account , and create a "New Story" by clicking on the green button on the far right of the screen. 

2) Watch how I search for stories, images and/or music through Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, YouTube, Flickr, GIFs, Getty images, Google and SoundCloud. Try this out quickly. 

3)Do you see how you have the option of connecting to YOUR OWN Facebook or Twitter account? You might consider using this feature if you want to pull from your own lives directly when creating aspects of this story/director's notebook.

3 Guided Practice

Ask students to list out some of the criteria that we should be sure to include/ develop in our coming-of-age films based on the  models  in Storify:  

Model 1 - Here is a model of a short "coming-of-age" film: 

https://storify.com/Alliyah574/forever-love#publicize

Model 2- Here is an incomplete (partial) model of a page from a "director's notebook":

https://storify.com/kelseygarc/september-7

As you look at the models, share-out  some of the criteria the coming-of-age movie/director's notebook should include and demonstrate understanding of.  (An example of one piece of criteria which is evident in Model 1:  you should show understanding of characterization - speech, thoughts, effect on others, actions, looks.)

Students list out the following criteria:

-characterization

-mood

-exposition, climax, resolution

-conflict (person vs. person, person vs. self, person vs. society/nature)

-tropes and cliches in coming-of-age films

-cinematic devices (framing, lighting, sound)

Prompt students to consider which aspects are well developed in the student models and which aspects are missing and/or underdeveloped in the models.

Student Instructions

As a whole class, let's look at a model of a "coming-of-age" film and a model of "director's notebook" and share-out some of the criteria that we should be sure to include/ develop in our own coming-of-age films/ director's notebooks based on these  models:

Model 1 - Here is a model of a short "coming-of-age" film: 

https://storify.com/Alliyah574/forever-love#publicize

Model 2- Here is an incomplete (partial) model of a page from a "director's notebook":

https://storify.com/kelseygarc/september-7

2)Let's chart the criteria... (For example, one piece of criteria which should be included and is evidence in Model 1: show understanding of characterization by developing the character's speech, thoughts, effect on others, actions, looks).

3)Which aspects are well developed in the student models and which aspects are missing and/or underdeveloped in the models? 

 

4 Independent Practice

Tell students to spend the rest of class working on your coming-of-age film/ director's notebook! This will most likely take the rest of the period and at least one more class period. 

Scaffolds:

-Teacher should prompt students to share out their ideas and chat with partners if they are stuck about aspects of their story or to solicit peer feedback as they work. 

-Additionally, teacher may provide students with tips for searching and/or generating ideas for their stories by having them search for scenes from TV shows/ films they've watched and think about how they might recycle or remix these scenes for use in their own stories. (They could chart ideas on a planning page or story board first if they prefer.)

Student Instructions

Spend the rest of class working on your coming-of-age film/ director's notebook! This will most likely take the rest of the period and at least one more class period. 

Tips that might help you as you work:

-share out ideas and chat with partners about aspects of your story as you work to  help each other brainstorm, problem-solve, etc.

-When you're searching and/or generating ideas for your stories, you might start by searching for scenes from TV shows/ films you've watched and think about how you might recycle or remix these scenes for use in your own stories. (You could chart ideas on a planning page or story board first if you prefer.)

5 Wrap Up

Students should self-assess their stories/ director's notebooks against the rubric criteria they generated earlier before showing these to the class. You might have students respond to the following questions via a polling tool such as Poll Everywhere so that all students can see each other's responses and track patterns across the class. 

Which rubric criteria/category do you think you have demonstrated the greatest mastery in? Which category did you struggle with the most. Explain. 

Students could then share their stories as an electronic gallery walk, where they rotate around the room to each laptop to view stories, providing specific feedback based on the rubric/ checklist criteria.  Additionally, as students circulate around the room to watch each other's stories they can use the "comment" button next to each image to give feedback directly. The teacher might assess student's understanding of cinematic techniques by having students comment on a few of their own images first by identifying the type of framing or lighting that was used in some of the images the student selected.

Additional options for sharing work:

-The class could vote on the top 3 films which they think met most of the rubric criteria.

-The teacher could have each student post his/her logline on the board and then have the class try to match up the loglines with each film/director's notebook as they circulate around the room to watch and analyze each.

-Students could discuss and plan how they would create one giant class master film "mash-up" from all of the individual films. They could consider how plot events in each individual story could be sequenced creatively and place a # next to each film for where it should go in the sequence of the master film mash-up.

Student Instructions

1)Click the Poll Everywhere link I've posted on the SmartBoard and, before sharing these stories with peers, let's self-assess our own stories/ director's notebooks against the rubric criteria we generated earlier. Which rubric criteria/category do you think you have demonstrated the greatest mastery in? Which category did you struggle with the most. Explain. 

2)Now, let's share our stories via an "electronic gallery walk". We will rotate around the room to each laptop/computer to view each other's stories. Bring some paper with you to assess each peer's story against the class criteria.  Additionally, as you circulate, use the "Comment" button (available next to each image) to give comments on  at least 2 of the images/ portions in each story. 

3)Extension: Discuss and plan how you would create one giant class master film "mash-up" from all of the individual films. Consider how plot events in each individual story could be sequenced creatively and place a # next to each peer's film for where it should go in the sequence of the master film mash-up.