Lesson Plan

Create a light-up Backpack using LilyPad Arduino

Students design their own circuit to augment their own backpack to include a LilyPad Arduino circuit
Anthony C.
Technology coordinator
Bayview Glen
Toronto, ON
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My Grades 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12
My Subjects English Language Arts, Math, Science, Social Studies, Arts
Digitial Citizenship and EdTech Mentor
Objectives

Knowledge Goals:
Students should explore how to access and view self-help videos on building LilyPad Arduino projects
Students should be able to create a simple circuit using LilyPad Arduino
Students should be able to connect wires to design a complete circuit

Reasoning Goals:
Students should be able de-bug and trouble shoot
Students should be less concerned with coding efficiency and more interested in artistic effect

Skill Goals:
Students should be able to create, iterate and share a backpack design using e-textiles
Students should be self-directed learners who seek out new learning and opportunities to complete, improve and iterate projects (learner transformed)

Product Goals:
Students should be able to create, iterate and share a backpack using an e-textile with purpose. (i.e. lights up when tablet is secure, lights up for use when biking or skateboarding

Subjects
Science
engineering
electricity
Grades 4 - 8
All Notes
Teacher Notes
Student Notes

1 Hook: Introduction to Computational Thinking and Making

Questions specific to lessons

How might we leverage circuits to improve the design and functionality of a backpack?
Could we use a light or stretch sensor to indicate when a tablet or other fragile device is secure inside the bag?
Could we add turn signals to our backpack to aid safety? – Source
Could we use a solar panel that could be embedded to charge your phone or tablet?
Could we use a light to light up the inside the pack to see the contents?
Could we use a stretch sensor to be programmed when a pack is too heavy according health guide guidelines?
Questions for all making and designing
How can we prepare students for a programmable world?
What programming skills are needed for individuals to survive and thrive in the internet of things?
How can use computational thinking to solve challenges?
How can I use computational thinking to help others? How can computational thinking aid my learning?

Create a design journal to answer some or all of these questions throughout the unit

Demonstrate your prior knowledge of the Scratch programming language is an example of computational thinking.

Student Instructions

Questions specific to lessons

How might we leverage circuits to improve the design and functionality of a backpack?
Could we use a light or stretch sensor to indicate when a tablet or other fragile device is secure inside the bag?
Could we add turn signals to our backpack to aid safety? – Source
Could we use a solar panel that could be embedded to charge your phone or tablet?
Could we use a light to light up the inside the pack to see the contents?
Could we use a stretch sensor to be programmed when a pack is too heavy according health guide guidelines?
Questions for all making and designing
How can we prepare students for a programmable world?
What programming skills are needed for individuals to survive and thrive in the internet of things?
How can use computational thinking to solve challenges?
How can I use computational thinking to help others? How can computational thinking aid my learning?

Create a design journal to answer some or all of these questions throughout the unit.

Demonstrate your prior knowledge of the Scratch programming language is an example of computational thinking.

2 Direct Instruction: Use LilyPad Design Kit (LDK) as an introduction to e-textiles

In this stage, the teacher directs students through the sample activities using whiteboard and projector.

Instructional Strategies

 Co-operative Learning Groups
 Direct Instruction
 Journals
 Structured Overview
 Compare & Contrast
 Didactic Questions
 Demonstrations
 Interactive Instruction
 Brainstorming
 Peer Partner Learning
 Discussion
 Think, Pair, Share
 Cooperative Learning Groups
 Jigsaw
 Indirect Instruction
 Inquiry
 Independent Study
 Inquiry
 Computer Assisted Instruction
 Learning Logs
 Instructional Skills
 Explaining
 Demonstrating
 Questioning
 Experiential Learning Simulations
 Games
 Storytelling
 Role-playinq
 Model Building Teaching Strategies

 

Vocabulary 

Circuitry, Conceptual understanding,
E-textiles, Toolkits LilyPad Arduino, program, microcontroller, sensors, conductive thread, sewing, thread, needle, LED lights, batteries
de-bug, loops, iterate, commands, parallel processing, algorithms, logical reasoning, decomposition, patterns, remixing, abstraction, modularization, reusing, remix

Student Instructions

In this stage, you will explore the sample activities from the SparkFun site. 

Success Criteria

Students can:
 Create programs using Modkit or open source Arduino platform
 Create e-textile projects using other projects and tutorials as guides
 Use a variety of blocks and coding to create projects
 Access studios and re-mix the projects of others using LilyPond
 Solve and debug errors in programs individually, in small groups and occasionally as a whole class
 Create a Design Journal to reflect upon their own learning (metacognition) and dialogue with facilitator
 Collaborate with peers to create and critique projects
 Communicate effectively and persuasively about the purpose, audience and artistic vision for creation
 When appropriate, share projects with others for critical review

3 Guided Practice: Create “critique groups” to explore each person’s work

Cooperative Grouping: students work in “critique groups” to assess projects

POC
(POC What is it?)
Products – Students program and sew a circuit into their backpack
Observations – Students record their progress in design journals or regular photo collections
Conversations – Students and teachers interact through commenting in online forum and in face-to-face situations, shared projects may receive feedback at an appropriate time from a shared “critique group”

Student Instructions

Cooperative Grouping: students work in “critique groups” to assess projects

Access Page 14 of the Learner's  guide 

http://scratched.gse.harvard.edu/guide/download.html 

4 Independent Practice: programming with Arduinos tutorials using Arduino or ModKit

Differentiated Learning Strategies 

Differentiation by Outcome
Use of Step-by-Step tutorials - These step-by-step guides are specific to projects and include some multimedia but are mostly text and graphics based.

Differentiating by Readiness and Interest 
Flexible Grouping – Students asked to work in groups to critique projects add each other.
Differentiating by Process and Learning Style
Students can follow video tutorials, work collaboratively, or individually. (see below)

Tutorials
Spark Fun Tutorials : LINK
Other Tutorials
1. Intro: Basic Circuit with PCB LED
2. Intermediate: Parallel Circuit with more than one LED 3. Advanced: Using the Lilytiny or Lilytwinkle

Software Open Source Arduino platform – www.arduino.cc

Modkit – (visual block based coding like Scratch) Sites and Resources https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials LilyPond (http://lilypond.media.mit.edu) for sharing

Brennan, Karen et al. Creative Computing. Harvard Graduate School of Education. published under Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike license. retrieved from http://scratched.gse.harvard.edu/guide/
http://lilypadarduino.org

Student Instructions

Use these tutorials to aid with your projects. 

Tutorials
Spark Fun Tutorials : LINK
Other Tutorials
1. Intro: Basic Circuit with PCB LED
2. Intermediate: Parallel Circuit with more than one LED 3. Advanced: Using the Lilytiny or Lilytwinkle

Software Open Source Arduino platform – www.arduino.cc

Modkit – (visual block based coding like Scratch) Sites and Resources https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials LilyPond (http://lilypond.media.mit.edu) for sharing

Brennan, Karen et al. Creative Computing. Harvard Graduate School of Education. published under Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike license. retrieved from http://scratched.gse.harvard.edu/guide/
http://lilypadarduino.org

5 Wrap Up - Final Design work - Design Sprint

Activity: Presenting

Using the feedback from Project Pitch and Critique Group, makers should be working on the final adjustments for their projects. 

Student Instructions

Using the feedback from Project Pitch and Critique Group, makers should be working on the final adjustments for their projects. 

6 Presentation and Showcase of Projects and Reflection

Invite learning community to explore backpacks and new innovations.

Student Instructions

Invite learning community to explore backpacks and new innovations.