Teacher Review For The Sims 4

Fun way to learn and reflect on human behavior, systems, and design.

My Rating 5
Learning Scores
Engagement 4
Pedagogy 4
Support 4
I Would Recommend It Yes
Setup Time 5-15 minutes
Great for Creation
Knowledge gain
Student-driven work
Teacher-led lessons
Great with Advanced learners
Low literacy
Special needs
How I Use It
The Sims 4 came out about year ago and I think it’s a terrific game for learning. I spent about 30 hours playing it and watching others play it on YouTube. You design and control a family in the Sim world and help them get jobs, find entertainment, make friends, and fall in love. The Sims series has always been a simulation of daily life itself, everything from having to pee to shopping for clothes. Learning in this game happens because of 3 reasons: 1) The game makes us attend to and reflect on the many needs and desires of human beings (social needs, economic needs, romantic needs, health needs, etc). 2) The game makes us engage with and reflect upon how different social and economic systems work. For example, you can run a retail store and deal with everything from employee management to marketing campaigns to restocking items. 3) The endless customization, modding and design possibilities in the game world (which allows you, for example, to build and design your own house in a very detailed way; to dress your character with clothes you buy, or design your own clothes and upload them into the game world; to mod the game with your own interesting systems (for example, someone created a mod that added schools)). There’s a Sims player called The Sim Supply in Australia that made a fascinating 20-part Let's Play on YouTube of his sim going from starving artist to running her own art gallery. He has 300,000 followers and 42 millions of views!
My Take
I think this game can really turn many students’ crank (particularly those with a design/construction bend). You can also imagine combining The Sims 4 with SimCity, which takes a more macro-view of systems and behaviors. The Center for Games and Impact created 2 learning guides (one for parents, another for players) for The Sims 3 (which is an earlier version of the game). Those guides could be used for the newer Sims.