You Asked. We Listened. New Reviews of iMovie,, Geddit, and Nearpod

May 13, 2014
Erin Wilkey Oh Executive Editor, Education Marketing
Common Sense Education


Every day, a teacher steps into the classroom and tries something new -- a new way to inspire kids, to engage them, to challenge their thinking. We know that Common Sense Education's teacher community is on the cutting edge when it comes to edtech. You try out the newest tools first and are eager to share your experiences. That's why we welcome your requests for product reviews. And we listen when you ask.

Today, we're spotlighting products that you requested. The list includes a powerful movie maker that's great for a range of skill levels, a website that gets kids pumped to learn coding, an online student response tool that boosts student confidence, and an interactive presentation tool that engages students and provides real-time feedback. Take a look at the reviews below, and add your own Field Note to share how you use the app or site in your teaching.


iMovie is a powerful and portable video production app for creating stunning HD movies and trailers. The app's streamlined interface is clutter-free and relatively easy to use. Kids first choose a template (8 for movies, 14 for trailers), then shoot or import video, photos, and audio. Read full review.'s tutorial was created to pique kids' interest in programming in just one hour. As part of the "Hour of Code" initiative, the site -- among other things -- aims to get millions of students to try out programming, if only for one hour. The tutorial includes video instructions from a few famous men (Gates, Zuckerberg, and Bosh), as well as some younger female programmers. Read full review.

Geddit is an online student response tool with an extra piece: Students can choose signal bars to reflect their level of confidence with any given question. As with similar tools, teachers set up classes and lessons; students can respond anonymously using a mobile device. Read full review.

Nearpod is the go-to app for interactive presentations and assessments. Teachers create their own multimedia presentations or use a growing library of pre-made presentations (many CCSS-aligned and some at a cost). The presentations can include multiple-choice quizzes, slideshows, polls, draw-its (students write directly on a slide), and open-ended questions. Read full review.

Is there a product that you enjoy using in the classroom but can't find on Common Sense Education? We invite you to add your voice to the conversation and recommend a product for review today! While we can't guarantee we'll review the product you recommend, we consider all the suggestions we receive.