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10 Games and Apps with Great Teacher Support

October 24, 2013
Ellen Holderman
Common Sense Education

CATEGORIES Common Sense Resources, In the Classroom, Technology Integration
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This Top-Pick List Friday, we are looking games and apps that have great built-in support for teachers. These games will engage students but also allow teachers to create custom assignments, lesson plans, and keep track of student progress.

To see the rating of each app, game, or website, visit the Top-Picks List "Games and Apps with Great Teacher Support".

 

BrainPOP Jr.
BrainPOP Jr. is a subscription-based educational video, game, and activity site for kids in kindergarten through third grade. Teachers can search for specific videos and activities using the search tool, which categorizes content by subject, grade, and state standard. Read full review.

DreamBox Learning Math
DreamBox Learning Math is an interactive, adaptive, self-paced program that provides engaging activities for students to learn and practice skills and concepts in mathematics. Teachers and parents create accounts for individual students, and the work begins by selecting the child’s grade level (kindergarten through sixth grade). Read full review.

Scratch
Scratch is a project from MIT's Lifelong Kindergarten Group that teaches math, programming, and creative expression through technology. Most of the learning is tacit and supported by classroom teachers helping kids learn to code. Read full review.

MangaHigh
Mangahigh.com is a Flash-based platform that boasts a dozen math games and hundreds of tutorials and quizzes -- all aligned with Common Core standards. Once a teacher sets up an account, kids go to their school's unique URL and log in with the user info their teacher provides. Read full review.

The Oregon Trail
The Oregon Trail lets kids lead their family westward across the American frontier and get many chances to build decision-making and problem-solving skills along the way. If teachers choose use The Oregon Trail as part of a unit of study, they might ask kids to note historical figures or U.S. landmarks they encounter along the trail.Read full review.

Gamestar Mechanic
Gamestar Mechanic is an online toolset, game, and community that teaches kids how to build games. Teachers get management tools to see students' progress, track their work, assign projects, curate featured games, and manage class profiles from kids' workshops. Read full review.

iCivics
Retired Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor founded iCivics to reverse a decline in civic knowledge and help kids better understand and respect the U.S. government. An extensive dashboard lets teachers create classes and assign games by state and Common Core standards and by grade. Read full review.

Coaster Crafter
Coaster Crafter is a great tool for teaching students about force and motion. On the whole, it does a great job of using virtual experience to teach somewhat abstract concepts. A teachers section includes printable lesson plans for before and after the roller coaster simulation. Read full review.

Quandary
Quandary is an online ethics game that teaches students how to gather and evaluate information to make better decisions. To make facilitation easier, the Quandary website includes a walkthrough, list of standards, lesson plans, a worksheet, and videos of classroom implementation. Read full review.

MinecraftEdu
MinecraftEdu transforms Minecraft into a teacher-directed virtual learning environment. With MinecraftEdu, teachers can quickly host servers and build custom maps with integrated content as well as create and administer assignments and lessons. Read full review.

 

What websites or apps do you use that has great built-in teacher support? Sign in to comment below.

Subjects & Skills (click to expand)

Comments

Jolene Smith
Homeschooling parent/instructor
Homeschool
Honolulu, HI

This is a great resource list. I've already used a few of these with my children and a few other students that I freelance with. Could I suggest a game that I use called http://www.mathblaster.com/ ? The reason I say that is cause usually math games are so theory driven that it's hard to keep their attention. I have used it with great success. Haven't tried Dreambox yet. I will try it out right away!

Amy Wilson
Common Sense Media
San Francisco, CA

Jolene,
Thanks for your suggestion. We have a form for teachers (and homeschoolers too)! to fill out when they have a product they'd like to see reviewed on Graphite. Down at the bottom of the page, see the link that says, "Suggest a Product for Review." We take these suggestions seriously, but get many of them, so can't guarantee that the product will be reviewed. We really appreciate when we here from teachers about what's working!