Common Sense Review
Updated November 2015


Handy classroom-management tool could use more qualitative feedback
Common Sense Rating 2
Teacher Rating
Not Yet Rated
  • Visual progress reports
  • Quick taps record student behaviors and make for easy classroom management.
  • Custom attendance and behavior types provide some flexibility.
  • Usable gradebook, though not as feature-packed as industry standard options.
  • Informative visualizations of all classroom data
  • Nicely formatted charts make whole-class views easy.
Fantastic reports, great organization tools, and intuitive setup simplify paperwork so you can focus on teaching.
No student access and numerical grades can leave teachers feeling limited.
Bottom Line
We all need a way to keep grades and take roll, and this is a good way to go digital; however, it's missing some core qualitative feedback features that help foster deeper learning.
Galen McQuillen
Common Sense Reviewer
Common Sense Rating 2
Engagement Is the product stimulating, entertaining, and engrossing? Will kids want to return? 3

Graphs and data visuals help students and parents understand progress reports more meaningfully. Beyond that, there’s no involvement of students.

Pedagogy Is learning content seamlessly baked-in, and do kids build conceptual understanding? Is the product adaptable and empowering? Will skills transfer? 2

This isn’t likely to improve learning experiences, especially since it sticks closely to a traditional letter grade paradigm. Student reports can help build self-awareness and agency to improve progress on learning goals.

Support Does the product take into account learners of varying abilities, skill levels, and learning styles? Does it address both struggling and advanced students? 4

Support is the name of the game here and it succeeds. Student and class data is intuitively laid out, well visualized, and easily entered. This is a one-stop shop for all your organizational needs.

About our ratings and privacy evaluation.
How Can Teachers Use It?

In situations where teachers don't have to use mandated recording systems, TeacherKit is a good option for keeping track of grades and attendance, as well as managing behavior issues and seating charts. To maximize the benefit to students, it would be best to set up regular distribution of reports, as these are not available on-demand. Also, given that the built-in reporting is purely quantitative, this should be coupled with some kind of narrative feedback.

Teachers can also use this to follow class and individual trends to make meaningful decisions about lesson planning, pacing, and review. This does require a decent amount of work to keep the gradebook current and good discipline to enter attendance every day, but these are necessary chores even without technological aides.

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What's It Like?

TeacherKit aims to be the cure for classroom-organization challenges, from maintaining a gradebook and taking attendance to behavior management and progress reports. The intuitive interface allows all this to be done with quick taps and swipes, generating data visualizations on the fly, both for whole classes and individual students. The student-profile system makes contacting students and their parents a breeze, and the premium version adds the ability to send detailed progress reports, complete with behavior and attendance breakdowns.

The interface itself follows the trend of clean, crisp minimalism, making it a joy to use, and features take only a tiny bit of trial and error to figure out (in-app tutorials help). A few crashes, freezes, and missing features result in a headache or two, but overall things work as they should.

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Is It Good For Learning?

It’s tough to assess the effect TeacherKit can have on learning without getting into deep conversations about the virtues of grades, but it's certainly true that any time students can see their own progress they will be in a better position to grow than when that data is sealed off in a gradebook. This enables teachers to present that data in an easily digestible way, but there’s no way for students to access their data on their own, a feature present on most modern gradebook applications. Further, grades are limited to numerical or letter versions, and the option to give qualitative feedback is notably absent.

Is it better for learning than traditional progress reports? Undoubtedly. But it's still only a very nice replacement for antiquated attendance systems, spreadsheets, and grade ledgers. It's worth keeping an eye on TeacherKit to see how it evolves over time, and for those teachers just looking to dip a toe into using apps to replace traditional classroom management, it's worth a look.

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