Teacher Review For NPR News

The true nature of science and math is most often found in innovative reporting about the real world.

Dena L.
Classroom teacher
Diamond Bar High School
Diamond Bar, CA
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My Grades 9, 10, 11, 12
My Subjects Math
My Rating 4
Learning Scores
Engagement 4
Pedagogy 5
Support 3
My Students Liked It Yes
My Students Learned Yes
I Would Recommend It Yes
Setup Time Less than 5 minutes
Great for Homework
Student-driven work
Teacher-led lessons
Whole class
Great with Advanced learners
Low literacy
Special needs
How I Use It
I teach the IB Theory of Knowledge course for seniors in our International Baccalaureate Diploma Program. It is often disturbing how little these highly motivated students understand about the true nature of knowing in both science and mathematics. The NPR news website and app provide a gateway for my students to encounter radio articles addressing current events, including advances in science and mathematics, that often provide interesting, cross-disciplinary perspectives. One example is this article (link from the website) that notes a collusion between science and art: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=15819485 . I use this tool by finding these jewels, either by easily scanning the headlines in the app or by listening to the articles on the radio, and presenting them in class to my students to spark a class discussion on the nature of knowing within math and science or serve as the prompt for a writing assignment. I also may create a home listening assignment with similar objectives.
My Take
This is an amazing resource. I believe it is a great tool for a teacher who clearly sees herself as a facilitator, directing students to interesting, relevant content and then motivating them to explore the big ideas and the implications of those big ideas. It is so nice to know that articles and podcasts that are effective in the classroom are easily archived. So far, I have used about 50--and haven't lost one. I would not use this tool for independent work without teacher direction.