Common Sense Review
Updated September 2013

Doodle Fit 2: Around the World

Souped-up sequel still challenges spatial reasoning
Common Sense Rating 4
Teacher Rating
Not Yet Rated
  • Kids can choose to play alone, connect with friends or anonymous players over the network, or solve puzzles published by the community.
  • Levels are now organized by countries starting with USA and then moving to Mexico, and kids can browse a rotatable globe but really the geography lesson ends there.
  • kids must use a collection of four-unit blocks plus rods to recreate a larger shape without empty spaces or overlaps.
  • In-app purchases and game networking options could be concerns for teachers.
  • Featured community puzzle Roswell includes a spaceship and saguaro cactus while the Einstein puzzle has some hairy appendages.
Pros
Kids learn the geometry concept of area through fun thematic puzzles, and apply their knowledge creatively.
Cons
Kids aren’t encouraged to try multiple solutions; in-app purchases and game networking options could be concerns for teachers.
Bottom Line
Game-style puzzles teach area and units through creativity and competition.
Leslie Crenna
Common Sense Reviewer
Common Sense Rating 4
Engagement Is the product stimulating, entertaining, and engrossing? Will kids want to return? 4

Slick graphics and colorful puzzles will draw kids in. Game mode, achievements, and challenges will keep them playing.

Pedagogy Is learning content seamlessly baked-in, and do kids build conceptual understanding? Is the product adaptable and empowering? Will skills transfer? 3

Create-your-own mode infuses creativity. Help is still mostly limited to explaining how to play and lacks puzzling strategy.

Support Does the product take into account learners of varying abilities, skill levels, and learning styles? Does it address both struggling and advanced students? 4

Creation community extends learning and interest. Hints are helpful and easy to access.

About our ratings and privacy evaluation.
How Can Teachers Use It?

Teachers can use Doodle Fit 2 to teach area and unit concepts to third graders. If email accounts are possible and individual devices are available, you can hook students by challenging pairs or small groups to complete puzzles fast in timed mode. Once reeled in, you might lead a whole-group discussion about the experience and the individual blocks — exploring unit concepts along the way. Individual or small group activities include creating new puzzles of a particular area (and shape for fun or to reinforce shapes) or perhaps puzzles made with a certain selection of blocks to be described in terms of units. Students could also use the game to reinforce spatial reasoning skills as homework or a learning center assignment. Teachers and students could use statistics to measure improvements in speed before and then after learning activities or host challenges to find multiple solutions.

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What's It Like?

Doodle Fit 2: Around the World is a gaming version of the original Tetris-style puzzler, Doodle Fit. While it stays true to its basic puzzling roots and even adds a new create-your-own mode, required and lengthy email registration and confirmation, required gaming and scoring networks, and in-app purchases all combine to up the appropriate target age and make it a bit iffy for school use.

As with the original, kids must use a collection of four-unit blocks plus rods from two to five units long, a three unit angle, and a single unit to recreate a larger shape without empty spaces or overlaps. The inability to rotate shapes makes the game a bit easier but larger continuous-area shapes can really challenge. Kids can choose to play alone, connect with friends or anonymous players over the network, or solve puzzles published by the community. The original Doodle Fit remains a good choice especially if email registration or online play aren't possible. As of review time, the Android version downloads and opens but crashes after network sign in.

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Is It Good For Learning?

Doodle Fit 2: Around the World puts puzzling in the palm for third graders learning about area and units. The best news is a new create-a-level function that challenges kids to make thematic puzzles of their own to share. Featured community puzzle Roswell includes a spaceship and saguaro cactus while the Einstein puzzle has some hairy appendages. Levels are now organized by countries starting with USA and then moving to Mexico, and kids can browse a rotatable globe but really the geography lesson ends there. Hints are earned one for every two puzzles solved but in-app hint packs are available for a price. The equivalent of progress tracking, in this case, getting to see puzzle solutions for those with more than one, has disappeared from the original, discouraging kids from trying additional possible solutions.

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See how teachers are using Doodle Fit 2: Around the World